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Green roof's.

heat island effect air pollution gardens

 
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#1 Shortpoet-GTD

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 03:01 AM

Garden or green roof's have been around for years, and it's a wonderful idea for
large cities.
It helps reduce the heat island effect, cuts pollution, lowers the heat that
the buildings a/c units have to fight against and helps capture rain water.
Chicago has been ahead of the curve for many years, but now, New York city
is joining in this common sense approach of "mining" roof-tops.

"Given how valuable space is in New York City, the city’s rooftops are strangely empty.
But a proposal from the city’s planning department could change that by making 1,200 acres of commercial rooftops available for urban farmers to open greenhouses across the city.

City law imposes restrictions on how tall buildings are allowed to be in different areas,
which is one reasons why rooftops stay empty — developers often build to the maximum height
possible. The planning department’s proposal would allow buildings to add rooftop greenhouses
above regular height restrictions.
And according to a study from the Urban Design Lab, that would mean 1,200 acres of empty, flat rooftops would be eligible for green penthouses.
Rooftop greenhouses will be required to incorporate rainwater collection and reuse systems,
which will help the city mitigate the pressure that big rainstorms puts on the sewer system."

http://grist.org/lis...ps-for-farming/

http://explorechicag...een_Roofs_.html
http://www.google.co...PUBMA0&dur=2390

Even if roof's are not veggie gardens but merely planted in grasses or wildflowers,
they help with all the things mentioned above, and can be a resting place and
food source for bees and butterflies.

#2 omkar1991

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 03:59 AM

Great post there. A "green roof" definitely is a great idea, especially if you have plants there. Rainwater harvesting is a great idea too. Part of the rainwater could go to the main water supply of the house, and part of it could go to a central pond in the neighborhood, which could be in a garden or something.

#3 Shortpoet-GTD

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 04:21 AM

View Postomkar1991, on 28 January 2012 - 03:59 AM, said:

Great post there. A "green roof" definitely is a great idea, especially if you have plants there. Rainwater harvesting is a great idea too. Part of the rainwater could go to the main water supply of the house, and part of it could go to a central pond in the neighborhood, which could be in a garden or something.
Some homeowners may incorporate it, but it's mostly for large cities. It only takes several inches of soil
to accommodate plants, veggies or flowers.
They planted half of a government building in Chicago, for example and the planted side was
50-60% cooler than the asphalt side.
Black asphalt roofs can add a lot of heat to the area, and the a/c units have to work harder=burning
more coal.
If all the major cities in America planted their skyscraper black asphalt roofs, just think of the
emissions we'd save and how much cleaner the air would be.

#4 mariaandrea

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 01:25 PM

I think new design homes, office and apartment buildings should all be designed to withstand the strain of rooftop gardens.

And, Brooklyn has been leading the way in NYC for some time now. Here's a couple of rooftop gardens I read about some time ago.

http://www.brooklyngrangefarm.com/

http://rooftopfarms.org/

#5 jasserEnv

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 01:59 PM

I personally think that part of the LEEDS certification of buildings should take into account whether or not the rooftop is kept green. In my mind it would certainly encourage more creation of green rooftops on the bigger buildings that attempt to obtain LEEDS certification. Even if it was an area that was off limits to the public and simply had shrubs and grasses growing on it, it would help to improve city air quality while reducing cooling costs in the building and also the heat island effect as was mentioned. If people were allowed in those spaces, it would make for great areas to lower stress levels of the population reducing health care costs.

#6 omkar1991

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 08:32 PM

View PostShortpoet-GTD, on 28 January 2012 - 04:21 AM, said:

Some homeowners may incorporate it, but it's mostly for large cities. It only takes several inches of soil
to accommodate plants, veggies or flowers.
They planted half of a government building in Chicago, for example and the planted side was
50-60% cooler than the asphalt side.
Black asphalt roofs can add a lot of heat to the area, and the a/c units have to work harder=burning
more coal.
If all the major cities in America planted their skyscraper black asphalt roofs, just think of the
emissions we'd save and how much cleaner the air would be.

True, black absorbs more heat. Plus, the plants absorb surrounding carbon dioxide too, so that would definitely make the heat absorption less as compared to asphalt roofs. Indeed, it would be good for the environment around, and for dwindling resources too.

#7 Shortpoet-GTD

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 05:44 AM

"Those shingles on your roof have nothing better to do than soak up the sun all day long --
why not put them to work in powering your home as solar power producers?
It’s a commonsense concept, and one that Dow Solar (a division of Dow Chemical) has been working on for a while.
But new research from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Australia may go one better, by helping to develop solar shingles that also help to heat your home.

Researchers at the university have produced a prototype of a photovoltaic/thermal system that has demonstrated the
ability to produce warm (25 degrees Celsius, or 77 Fahrenheit) throughout winter. The technology employed by the system was developed by UNSW’s School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Engineering, and will be integrated into roofing panels,
which will then be tested and further developed through the school’s Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) for Low-Carbon
Living this year."
(Surprising to report something good coming from dow.)

http://www.huffingto..._n_1294849.html

#8 Sandra Piddock

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 01:36 AM

It's interesting how many ways a 'green roof' can help the environment. There are a lot of them in our village, where there a number of single storey houses. It gets very hot in the summer, and the green roof helps to offset that, as well as providing somewhere for those in the centre of the village to grow vegetables and herbs. I live in a ground floor apartment, otherwise I'd be right on to this myself.

#9 Shortpoet-GTD

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Posted 30 August 2012 - 05:58 AM

Some of the pro's for green roofs. :biggrin:
* Providing amenity space for building users- replacing a yard or patio
* Increasing roof life span
* Reducing storm water run off
* Providing noise insulation
* Filtering pollutants and CO2 out of the air
* Providing locally grown food (with roof-top vegetable gardens)
* Increasing wildlife habitat in built up areas
* Reducing heating (by adding mass and thermal resistance value) and cooling (by evaporative cooling) loads on a building
* Reducing the urban heat island effect

Chicago, a long time leader in green roofs, is giving homeowners $5,000 grants to plant green roofs.
Article

#10 FlanneryCam

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 09:32 PM

I love the idea! And I have a special fondness for lush rooftop gardens in condos and hotels. There is something really cool about having the pleasures of the park so high up.

I wish condos in Toronto would get on this bandwagon. Imagine how much nicer it would be living in a condo if you had a rooftop community garden?

Does anyone know offhand how growing plants so much higher affects the plant?

#11 Shortpoet-GTD

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 03:32 AM

There are mosses that grow on Mt. Everest at 21,000+ plus feet.
Up to and including 6500 feet (lower than most buildings) a list of plants that would do fine is
here.

#12 Shortpoet-GTD

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 04:02 AM

I don't agree with many of wal-mart's policies but this one; I applaud.

They are planting a green roof on their newest behemoth store (90,000 sq. ft.) in Portland, Oregon.

It will be the largest green roof in Oregon covering 40, 600 sq. ft.
(And Portland has a lot of green roof's) :biggrin:

http://www.portlando...dex.cfm?c=44422

Wm has also been installing solar arrays on their roofs in recent years, and have them on their 100th store,
boasting of 62 megawatts of solar panels.

Source

#13 Shortpoet-GTD

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 12:24 PM

Popular in space precious Hong Kong too.
http://phys.org/news...arved-hong.html

#14 Shortpoet-GTD

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 03:56 AM

Older thread
but this Green Fudge articleis an update.

Copenhagen is the first Scandinavian city to put a mandatory green roof policy into action.
Their goal is to be carbon neutral by 2025. Details are outlined in the article.

#15 Shortpoet-GTD

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 06:23 AM

Update-
United Design Group (USG) breaks ground on a spiraling green roofed kindergarten in China.
Link also contains galleries.
Via Inhabitat-
http://inhabitat.com...garten-in-wuxi/

#16 gpm

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 05:27 AM

Sounds Good!! Nice post and I would love to redesign is it too but it's too late. I spened all the money for other work. :)

#17 MattBnB

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 07:19 AM

It also helps prevent heat from being absorbed. I love the new lines of design

#18 Josh64

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Posted 09 February 2015 - 07:24 AM

great thread ! I thought I may be able to add to it with some of green roof's environmental and technical benefits!

Environmental benefits- Provides a natural habitat for birds and insects, helps filter out airborne toxins

Technical benefits- Can decrease the cost of a municipality's stormwater infrastructure, contributes to LEED points on a building
Source- aecdaily. com - search words green roofs: sustainable solutions

#19 Shortpoet-GTD

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Posted 23 March 2015 - 05:17 AM

France says; plants or solar on roof's. :biggrin:
Via The Guardian-
http://www.theguardi...=20150323cltw01

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